Monthly Archives: December 2018

Tour Comfort in the Hollywood Hills

Interior designer Jennifer Dyer loves you will find 52 windows in her Hollywood Hills, California, home. Dyer prizes organic light, which most Angelenos take for granted. She loves the way the sun’s rays fill her house throughout the day, which makes her feel like the luckiest girl on the block — despite her distinct block is filled with a few Hollywood heavyweights. “This is an easy house to reside in. It is filled with elegant rooms that are not overly formal and have a very lived-in sense of comfort and fashion,” says Dyer, who was happily involved with the remodel and design process of her house from start to end.

at a Glance
Who livers here: Jennifer Dyer, her fiancé and three Yorkshire terriers
Location: Hollywood Hills area of Los Angeles
Size: 2,975 square feet
That’s interesting: Your house is in Outpost Estates, home to celebrities like Ben Stiller, Penny Marshall and Bob Barker

Jeneration Interiors

Red creates its first and only appearance in the front entry, drawing the eyes — and visitors — in.

Door paint: Vermillon, Benjamin Moore

Dyer plays movement in the entryway: The artfully arranged sprigs reach up to the ceiling, whereas the waves in the wall art and also the hide rug seem to extend horizontally, producing tension and a feeling of movement.

Jeneration Interiors

Here Dyer artfully layers neutral shades of white and beige in varying intensities to create an evolved look that’s anything but staid. A mother-of-pearl mirror frame, damask tufted wingbacks, a bronze ram bust and ceramics occupy the same space, which makes the living room a study in artfully blending styles and elements.

Tufted wingbacks: custom by Schumacher

Jeneration Interiors

Although Dyer’s house is suspended in Hollywood Regency and conventional design styles, her accent pieces look to the Far East. A settee in a whispery blush tone along with a luxe incline chair coexist with a lacquer box along with also a canvas painting of Buddhist monks bought at a weekend market in Thailand.

The horned coffee table base and reindeer table lamp are a nod to creature and rustic chic. Dyer has worked antlers, horns and branches to almost every room.

Jeneration Interiors

The pairing of neutral tones with the blues and grays of the bed frame, fabrics and artwork makes a relaxing and relaxing bedroom space. Dyer added subtle pieces of flair to the room, like a gilded arced table lamp that quietly bows its head in the corner along with an elegant antique brushed brass chandelier.

Bed frame: Hickory Chair

Jeneration Interiors

Designer clothing and accessories abound in the walk-in cupboard of this Tinseltown designer, who changed what used to be a bedroom into a shoe and clothes enthusiast’s haven. “I wanted something with a little bit of glamour, so that I did away with the anticipated built-in island also hampers,” says Dyer. The middle table is used as a location to display outfits and makes for a “convenient place to put stuff on when packing for a trip.”

Straightforward white painted wood has been used for the storage and shelving units so the space could easily be turned back to a bedroom.

Jeneration Interiors

The oval claw-foot tub with a view to the lush environment is perfection independently, but what really elevates this bathroom are the light fixtures, which look like crystal lace earrings in this perfectly written space.

Tub: Circe cast iron, Kallista; light fixtures: Cascade wall brackets, Boyd Lighting; accent table: Midi Furniture

Jeneration Interiors

The four-poster bed ups the luxury of this guest bedroom. Although the overall effect of this space is decadent, nothing ever feels overly formal, and you have the feeling that it is perfectly fine to roll around the bed or toss the cushions on the floor.

Jeneration Interiors

“The house was already wonderful to begin with, but it had a few finishing details. Most of the cupboard doors have been broken, the entire space needed new light, and the kitchen had more shelves and functionality,” says Dyer.

The classic milky beauty of Calacatta marble contrasts with the deeper wooden shades of this dining table and chairs, bought by Dyer at the Santa Monica Swap Meet.

Jeneration Interiors

Instead of going daring with big metallic bits, Dyer artfully incorporates brass and gold accents in the dining area; the glimmer in the utensils, chair finish and furniture grabs the eye at different points of the room.

Dining seats: Thomas Pheasent for Baker; table: Artefacto; driftwood lamp: classic

Jeneration Interiors

Earth tones in the industrial-vintage floor lamp base, pub stools and window dressing hot up the pub at the corner of the family room.

Jeneration Interiors

The living room overlooks homage to the Southern California coastline. Swathed in ocean blue, nautical stripes and flashes of crimson, the distance is bathed in sunshine.

Jeneration Interiors

A dreamy cabana with decadent navy blue drapes provides shade and privacy poolside — but Dyer rarely pulls the drapes, because the 15-foot-tall ficus hedges enclosing the home provide plenty of seclusion.

For Dyer, the coolest aspect of this pool area is its own technologies: The light systems and pool controls are concentrated and can be modulated from her iPad.

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Butterfly Roof

Sharp angled roof lines that incline to the center create a butterfly roof. Popular after the nuclear age, this midcentury roof layout was a response to the boxy brick facades of the postwar norm. The crevice in the middle of the sloping roof was able to collect water in drought-affected locations, and the sharp angles let for excellent vaulted ceilings.

Gardner Architects LLC

This butterfly roof has equal-length sides and acts as an eave for the coated deck below.

Four Corners Construction, L.P.

The downspout of the butterfly roof shows where the water tends to run off, directly at the crevice where the two slopes meet.

Michael Tauber Architecture

This is an illustration of a butterfly roof. The lines of the structure are long and low, feature of contemporary design.

Neiman Taber Architects

Tongue and groove panels line the eaves of the contemporary butterfly roof.

Gaulhofer Windows

Though this looks like a butterfly roof, it’s really comprised of 2 skillion roofs, which both slant inward. The advantage of this is the vertical distance between allows for a wonderful clerestory window.

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Kitchen of the Week: 1920s Renovation in California

Teal closets, Spanish-inspired tile plus a cozy breakfast nook assisted choose this kitchen Los Angeles from packed to charming. The owners, a family of four, wanted their kitchen to fit into the home’s 1920s architecture but have all the modern amenities. For the renovation, designer Erica Islas knocked out walls, played with bright accents and integrated smart lighting to start up the space.

Erica Islas / EMI Interior Design, Inc..

A breakfast nook takes up less space than a normal table and feels cozier to boot. “It is always a great option under windows when you have an empty corner like this,” states Islas. The seat cushions were tailored with a mattress advantage for a thorough finish, and Islas discovered an ideal vintage 1920s lighting fixture at a local antiques store.

Cabinetry: custom by Erica Islas; backsplash: Malecon and White Malecon field tile, Montecarlo Tile; countertop: Blizzard, Caesarstone

Before Photo

Erica Islas / EMI Interior Design, Inc..

BEFORE: The original kitchen was too small for the family to hang in. Islas took the wall separating the cooking distance from the table to open things up and allow light to stream in. Although the kitchen is right next to the dining area, she wished to maintain a casual dining area for breakfast and dinner.

Erica Islas / EMI Interior Design, Inc..

Roman shades open from the surface, in place of the bottom, allowing light in while maintaining privacy.

A kitchen desk becomes the ultimate communication center when equipped with a customized corkboard, a built-in dry erase board and a chalkboard.

Lighting: Dispela; floors: San Felipe, Arto; breakfast: habit by Erica Islas; window seat fabric: Sunbrella

Erica Islas / EMI Interior Design, Inc..

Islas transported the soffit across the whole room, making it feel more intimate and providing her the liberty to use lights down for ambience. “With old houses, electric is obviously a challenge as you are dealing with needing to upgrade wiring and adding in more circuit breakers, which costs money and ends up eating into budgets,” she states.

Sink: Kohler; faucet: Rohl; teal cupboard color: Turtle Lake, Dunn Edwards; glass knobs: Anthropologie

Erica Islas / EMI Interior Design, Inc..

Islas started off with the San Felipe pattern flooring tile and chose up a Spanish tile for the backsplash. A palette of terra cottas, whites and teal accents felt just like a natural fit. Islas utilized the teal on the cabinetry, tile and window seat fabric to tie the room together.

“After” photographs: David Young-Wolff

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Barge Board

A barge board covers the ends of rafters at the gable end of a roof just like a fascia board, but it’s carved and decorative. They’re also called fly gable rafters or rafters.

Landmark Services Inc

The barge board on this dormer has been trimmed with gentle curves.

Landmark Services Inc

Every gable end of the roof and its dormers has a barge board.

Warwick Avenue

Barge board is purely decorative, following the components are complete added.

YuillBuilt

Decorative bargeboards are found on English Tudor, Gothic and Queen Anne style homes, giving a fairytale or gingerbread house quality to the facade.

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